How can Sweden and the US empower women in developing countries to make their countries more sustainable?

Washington DC’s famed cherry trees, known for their blossoms in the spring, bring another kind of beauty in the fall in front of the Washington Monument. Photo by Tim Brown.

Listen to what Swedish students suggest. The finalists in the US Embassy Environmental Policy Paper Competition 2016 was open in the beginning of May for students members of the Swedish Association of International Affairs and Stockholm School of Economics. This year’s research topic was “How can the United States and Sweden help ensure that women in developing countries participate equitably in helping their countries meet COP21 commitments?” The winning team wins a trip to Washington, D.C. this summer including meetings with environmental policy organizations and government officials.

Ranjula Bali SwainProfessor Ranjula Bali Swain at Mistra Center for Sustainable Markets at Stockholm School of Economics and Dr. Sarah Dickins at Stockholm Environment Institute will comment on the students’ papers and present their respective research in this field.picture of a woman called Dr. Sarah Dickins

The finalists in the US Embassy Environmental Policy Paper Competition 2016 will present their policy papers at a seminar at Stockholm School of Economics. Welcome to attend the open seminar on Wednesday May 25, 2.30 pm in Bonniersalen, Stockholm School of Economics (Handelshögskolan), Sveavägen 65, Stockholm.